James Nachtwey Archive

The Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College (“the Hood”) is, above all, a teaching museum. Its purpose is to enable and cultivate transformative encounters with works of artistic and cultural significance to advance critical thinking and enrich people’s lives. The Hood’s collection is among the oldest and largest of its kind in the nation, totaling more than 65,000 works across a broad spectrum of cultures and historical periods, with important holdings of American, European, African, and Melanesian art, and a strong focus on Native American art.

The Hood supports Dartmouth’s academic mission by continually broadening its impact across campus, while also serving as a cultural highlight for a diverse community of learners in the surrounding region and visitors from around the world. Within each of these contexts, the museum advances these goals: (1) to lead in object-based teaching and learning, setting the standard for experiential engagement with art and material culture; (2) to expand minds by developing collections, exhibitions, publications, and programs that question assumptions and encourage multivalent dialogue; (3) to create spaces of possibility, providing open and welcoming physical and digital platforms; and (4) to promote individual and collective creativity and invention, responding fluidly to the intersection of art and innovation.

A 2019 grant from the Cultures of Resistance Network helped to fund preservation and special projects related to the Nachtwey Archive, a complete archive of award-winning photojournalist and war photographer James Nachtwey, who has spent more than 35 years documenting conditions in some of the world’s most dangerous conflict zones.

Website: www.hoodmuseum.dartmouth.edu